A 14-year-old physics major has become the youngest person ever to graduate from Texas Christian University.

Carson Huey-You was among more than 2,000 students getting degrees on Saturday at the Fort Worth school, where he also minored in Chinese and Math.

While his achievements have already put him in the history books, the self-described ‘normal dude’ has already set his eyes on getting graduate and doctorate degrees in quantum mechanics.

But he doesn’t see himself as any different from others his age, and even shies away when others call him a ‘genius’ or ‘celebrity’.

‘I’m a normal dude,’ he told the star telegram. ‘It is just something I have learned to deal with because, to me I am not a genius. I am a normal 14-year-old person doing college-level stuff.’

 

Carson Huey-You, 14, is the youngest person ever to graduate from Texas Christian University. The prodigy is pictured here walking off the stage after receiving his bachelor's degree during the commencement ceremony held in Fort Worth, Texas, on Saturday
Carson Huey-You, 14, is the youngest person ever to graduate from Texas Christian University. The prodigy is pictured here walking off the stage after receiving his bachelor’s degree during the commencement ceremony held in Fort Worth, Texas, on Saturday
Carson was a physics major who double minored in math and Chinese after enrolling in 2013. He is pictured here hugging his mentor, physics professor Magnus Rittby
Carson was a physics major who double minored in math and Chinese after enrolling in 2013. He is pictured here hugging his mentor, physics professor Magnus Rittby

Carson – who is just four years older than the world’s youngest college graduate – first shot to the spotlight in 2013 when he entered the university at 11 years old. He had just graduated as the co-valedictorian in his high school.

But he was still intimidated by his new surroundings and says his college classes were a lot more difficult than he anticipated, especially the American environmental history, general chemistry II and classical mechanics classes.

‘It was scary at first because my high school was only one building versus a massive campus with tons of people,’ Carson told the paper.

‘After that, I really did get used to it because TCU was so accommodating and a positive influence really.

‘When I used to get bad test scores or something like that, I would go home and be disappointed and think about, “Oh, I should have known this, I should have done way better.”‘

Now, he told the local paper: ‘I know better how to deal with that disappointment, knowing that I will bounce back.’

But Carson shies away from the 'genius' or 'celebrity' labels and he  says he is just a 'normal dude.'  His mother Claretta Kimp, pictured here wiping away tears after watching her son receive his degree, says she just wants Carson to grow up to be a selfless person
But Carson shies away from the ‘genius’ or ‘celebrity’ labels and he  says he is just a ‘normal dude.’  His mother Claretta Kimp, pictured here wiping away tears after watching her son receive his degree, says she just wants Carson to grow up to be a selfless person
Carson has also shared the spotlight with his 10-year-old brother Cannan, who just graduated from the same high school and is planning to study engineering, physics and astronomy at the Texas Christian University. He is pictured here showing one of his graduation gifts, a Hobbit Lego set, after the commencement ended
Carson has also shared the spotlight with his 10-year-old brother Cannan, who just graduated from the same high school and is planning to study engineering, physics and astronomy at the Texas Christian University. He is pictured here showing one of his graduation gifts, a Hobbit Lego set, after the commencement ended

Fascinated by the ‘very small-scale things’ in quantum physics, he sees this field as central to the future of smartphones and other electronic devices.

‘Quantum mechanics deals with very, very small-scale things,’ Carson said.

‘Even, a lot of the times, past microscopic level so you get electrons, protons, neutrons — even smaller than that going into quarks.’

He then added: ‘Smartphones, computers, electronics — all of that stuff runs on quantum mechanics. If you want smaller technology that fits into smaller spaces, then that’s really where to look

This prodigy has also had to share the spotlight with his brother Cannan, a 10-year-old who graduated from the Accommodated Learning Academy – the same high school his brother attended  – and is also headed to the Texas Christian Academy to study engineering, physics and astronomy.

Even though both boys already have enough on their resume to make their mother proud, their mum Claretta Kimp – who shed a tear as her son received his diploma – loves to know that through it all her sons are still close.

‘It’s sweet,’ she said of their relationship, adding that she hopes her sons grow up to be selfless people who give back to society.

The self-described 'normal dude' has already set his eyes on  pursuing graduate and doctorate degrees in quantum mechanics
The self-described ‘normal dude’ has already set his eyes on  pursuing graduate and doctorate degrees in quantum mechanics
His knowledge of the physics field is uncanny and far from what the average 14-year-old knows. 'Quantum mechanics deals with very, very small-scale things,' he said. 'Even, a lot of the times, past microscopic level so you get electrons, protons, neutrons — even smaller than that going into quarks'
His knowledge of the physics field is uncanny and far from what the average 14-year-old knows. ‘Quantum mechanics deals with very, very small-scale things,’ he said. ‘Even, a lot of the times, past microscopic level so you get electrons, protons, neutrons — even smaller than that going into quarksStar-telegram

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